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Five Cool Nanotechnology Uses

Five Cool Nanotechnology Uses

Nanotechnology is sometimes referred to as an “all-purpose technology” due to its impact on nearly every conceivable industry and in everyday life. From medicine, to electronics, to food, nanotechnology is used in almost everything to improve the quality and safety of the products produced and continues to innovate the products we know and love.

We talk a lot about the water protection industry here at HZO, and the role of nanotechnology in that industry, but nanotechnology is so much more than that. Just to give you a glimpse at some of the awesome things nanotechnology is being used for, we put together this list.

Five Cool Nanotechnology Products & Their Uses:

1. LiquiGlide

LiquiGlide is essentially a new surface application nanotechnology for bottles and other food containers that will allow whatever is in those containers to slide out more easily. Developed by a team of mechanical engineers at MIT, LiquiGlide was invented to eliminate the frustration caused by frantically shaking ketchup, and other condiment bottles in hopes of being able to extract the last glob from the bottom of the container. With this new spray nanotechnology, whatever is in the bottles will just slide out on its own!

2. “Magic” Paper

A team of scientists at the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia in Genoa, Italy are developing an interesting way to use nanotechnology, embedding it inside regular paper to give it special “superpowers”, so to speak. With these special nanoparticles embedded, a plain sheet of paper can become antibacterial, fluorescent, or even magnetic if need be. What’s even cooler- this nanotechnology can apparently be applied not just to paper, but any non-woven material as well, including fabric.

3. Bioluminescence

What do fireflies and a string of Christmas lights have in common? Other than the fact that they both light up, someday you may be able to buy a string of them powered by the very same energy that fireflies produce! Scientists in Syracuse University’s College of Arts and Sciences are working on using nanotechnology to harness the power of bioluminescence, which is the natural light produced by fireflies, to be used as a type of green, plug-free energy source.

4. Bacteria Sensors

Scientists Su Dwarkanath and Sri Satyanarayana are working to develop a new, handheld bacteria sensor that could potentially be used in food packaging plants to quickly detect e-coli, as well as other harmful pathogens in foods. The use of nanotechnology in these sensors would not only dramatically speed up the detection process, but eliminate the need for plants to send out samples of their food for testing, resulting in cost savings and a decreased chance the contaminated food actually reaches grocery shelves.

5. The “Bionic Hornet”

Israel is using nanotechnology to develop a flying robot no bigger than a hornet- hence the name “bionic hornet.” This robot would be a military tool used to chase, photograph, and even potentially kill its targets, reducing the need for large scale bombings and other large military strikes in certain circumstances. The robot could also be used for surveillance, photography, and other research applications without the need of a pilot present.

Checkout more resources about nanotechnology as well as the rest of the water protection industry.

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